Sunday, February 18, 2018

STUDENT PROTEST LEADERS SUSPENDED



A university in Swaziland has suspended student leaders for ‘misconduct’ for organising a protest over fees, allowances and poor facilities.

And, all first-year students at the campus in Manzini have been sent home indefinitely following continued class boycotts.

It happened at the Southern Africa Nazarene University (SANU).

The Student Representative Council (SRC) Secretary-General Tiger Nxumalo and President Zamokuhle Mamba were handed letters of suspension. Other members of the SRC executive were informed verbally of their suspension.

The Swazi Observer (16 February 2018) quoted Mamba saying they had been charged with misconduct and were awaiting a disciplinary hearing.

A spokesperson for SANU said property had been vandalised by protesting students.

Students at SANU have a number of issues including delayed payment of allowances for first-year students, withholding of ongoing students allowances, unreasonable allowance reduction, lack of project allowances, exorbitant fees and poor infrastructure. They petitioned the Ministry of Labour and Social Security and the Swaziland Higher Education Council (SHEC) on Monday (12 February 2018). The petition came after a class boycott that started on the previous Wednesday.

There have been class boycotts across college campuses in Swaziland. Students at the kingdom’s biggest university UNISWA have been protesting about delays in payment of allowances. The university was closed on Monday.

SANU has a poor history of student relations. In 2014, they were told they could not resume their studies following class boycotts in the Faculty of Health Sciences unless they gave the university the names of strike leaders.
 
Students were forced to reapply to study and as part of that application they were told to complete questionnaires which included three questions: How did the student body resolve to boycott classes in the absence of a student representative council? Who was responsible for calling all students out of their classrooms to join the strike? Do you know who were in the forefront of the strike action / the leaders? Name them.

The students went on strike in a dispute over allowances, poor learning conditions in the institution, insufficient books in the library and lack of laboratory equipment for science experiments. 

See also

STUDENTS MARCH ON GOVERNMENT

DOCTORS’ ON-CALL ROW BACK AT MINISTRY



Swaziland’s Industrial Court has told the government to negotiate with doctors and health workers in a dispute over cuts in on-call and call-out allowances.

The Court dismissed an application from the doctors and health workers to strike down a directive from government that would cut incomes by up to 50 percent.

Industrial Court Judge Abande Dlamini referred the matter to the Ministry of Labour and Social Security. Should the matter not be resolved there it will be returned to court, the Swazi Observer reported on Friday (16 February 2017).

The court action came after doctors and health workers threatened to boycott on-call and call-outs.

See also

SWAZI HEALTH WORKERS BACK IN COURT

SWAZI DOCTORS SUSPEND STRIKE

HEALTH CRISIS: BLOOD SUPPLIES DRY UP

MEDICINE SHORTAGE: FIVE DIE

DRUG SHORTAGE CRISIS DEEPENS

Saturday, February 17, 2018

STUDENTS TO PROTEST 50/50 CELEBRATION



Students in Swaziland are set to protest against the ‘extravagant spending’ of the 50/50 celebrations to mark the King’s birthday and the anniversary of Independence from Britain.

The protest is due to take place on 12 April 2018, the anniversary of the proclamation that turned Swaziland from a democracy into a kingdom ruled by an absolute monarch.

In a statement (14 February 2018), the Swaziland National Union of Students (SNUS) said, ‘The National Executive Committee noted two upcoming national events in the terms of double celebration (50/50 celebration) and National Elections as projects that has been historically synonymous with corruption and extravagant spending and depriving the people fundamental social services in the process. In accordance with the 2018 theme, the NEC resolved to stage a protest on the 12th of April against extravagant spending and corruption.’

Details of the protest have still to be finalised.

The 50/50 celebrations are to mark the 50th birthday this year of King Mwsati III, sub-Saharan Africa’s last absolute monarch, and the 50th anniversary of Independence from Britain. It has already been announced that celebrations will take place on 19 April at Mavuso Trade and Exhibition Centre.

A budget of the equivalent of US$1.7 million has been given by the government. The Taiwan Government has donated US$1.3 million.

When similar celebrations took place in 2008 the cost of the so-called 40/40 celebrations overran by E32.6 million (about US$5 million at the then exchange rate). E17 million was budgeted but it ended up costing ‘at least’ E50.2 million. The exact figure is uncertain.

The celebrations took place at a time when Swaziland was under the pressure of savage financial cuts, imposed by the International Monetary Fund, after years of mismanagement of the economy by successive Swazi governments – all handpicked by King Mswati.

The intended SNUS protest is set for 12 April. This is an important date in Swaziland as it was on this day in 1973 that King Mswati’s father King Sobuza II issued a Royal Decree that banned all political parties and put all legislative, executive and judicial power in the hands of the King. Despite a Constitution that came into effect in 2006, the Decree has not been withdrawn.

Protests are held each year on the anniversary of 12 April.

See also

50/50: LEARN LESSON OF PAST DISASTER

APRIL 12 2012